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Moët & Chandon unveil the latest edition to their family of champagnes: the Moët Nectar Impérial Rosé Leopard in a limited-edition 6-liter, Methuselah-size bottle. Created for enjoyment “during exceptional and celebratory moments,” Moët & Chandon is limited to 60 bottles and features a leopard camouflage pattern to proclaim the boldness of the luxury rose demi-sec champagne, considered the most popular of its kind in the world. The leopard’s noble rosette effect on each of the 60 Moët & Chandon bottles were engraved by Frenchman, Arthus-Bertrand. 22-carat gold leaves add an extra level of luxury to the champagne presentation.This luxury limited-edition bottle, priced at $5,000 USD, will be available at Sherry-Lehmann Wine & Spirits in New York, shipping nationally, and at the most exclusive nightclubs nationwide starting December 1st. [See More]

Published in Dining & Spirits

As the champagne wars heat up, another power player in the game, Armand de Brignac, has recently launched their Dynastie Collection. This is a one of a kind collection of Brut Gold Champagne that includes every available format. Its release is similar to the way musicians like Neil Young have been known to release their entire collection at one time.Included is the standard 750 milliliter bottle right up to the 30-liter Midas Champagne. They have hooked up with Las Vegas of course to showcase the collection, at the Hakkasan Las Vegas night club. At $500,000, only the real heavy rollers can afford it, making it the most expensive bottle service ever. The collection amounts to 109 bottles and Hakkasan, a five-level culinary and nightlife mecca at the MGM Grand, is well equipped to deliver an over-the- top service of this sort. [Watch & Read More]

Published in Dining & Spirits

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The House of Martell has collaborated with French interior architect and designer Eric Gizard to create the Dôme gift box for L’Or de Jean Martell. “I worked by drawing inspiration from cabinets of curiosities where collectors would store precious, almost magical objects in Renaissance Europe,” Eric Gizard said. [Read More]

Published in Dining & Spirits